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Medik8 Hydr8 B5 Skin Rehydration Serum

Super hydrating B5 serum

£42.00

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A long drink of water for your skin this serum sinks in, plumps out fine lines and keeps your skin feeling smoother and more comfortable. It is great for any skin type since even oily skin needs moisture and hydration.

Hyaluronic acid holds many times its own weight in water. When it’s multi-molecular, like here, it has been broken into different sized fragments, so the bigger ones sit near the surface and smaller ones reach further into the skin to give a decent sandwich of hydration. The vitamin B5 is soothing and helps the skin barrier, so your skin will hold onto moisture better.

CATEGORY: Hydrating Serums

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Description

This is a long drink of water for your skin, in the form of a multi-molecular hyaluronic acid serum. It sinks in, plumps out fine lines and keeps your skin feeling smoother and more comfortable. It is great for any skin type since all skin, even oily skin, needs moisture and hydration.

  • Hyaluronic acid holds many times its own weight in water. When it’s multi-molecular, like here, the hyaluronic acid has been broken into different sized fragments, so the bigger ones sit near the surface and smaller ones reach further into the skin to give a decent sandwich of hydration.
  • The vitamin B5 in here is soothing and helps the skin barrier, so your skin will hold onto moisture better.

You just use a couple of drops when needed – most of the time – after cleansing, maybe after a vitamin C serum, and smooth it over the skin and wait for it to be absorbed.

Aqua (Water), Panthenol, Sodium Hyaluronate, Calcium Pantothenate, Phenoxyethanol, Ethylhexylglycerin, Citric Acid.


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